Grinnell College Physics Museum

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30 items

Almy's X-Ray Photograph of Keys and Coins

A photographs taken by Professor Almy in February 1896. The colors are the result of fading. Originally all would have been black and white.

Almy's X-Ray Photograph of Frog

A photograph taken by Professor Almy in February 1896. The colors are the result of fading. Originally all would have been black and white.

Almy's X-Ray Photograph of Hand

A photograph taken by Professor Almy in February 1896. The colors are the result of fading. Originally all would have been black and white.

Homemade Geiger counter

Grinnell's first Geiger counter which unfortunately is broken.

Hot Cathode X-ray Tube with Metal Collimator

According to Grant Gale, this belonged to Dr. Lemley, the first dentist in Grinnell to have x-rays.

Radiation Monitor

nu_101, Model 1613

Electric Egg

The electric egg is a glass vessel with an electrode at the top and another electrode at the bottom. At the bottom also is a tube with stopcock through which the air in the vessel can be pumped. It is used to demonstrate the production of light by a static electric charge. If the egg is evacuated and then a large static charge is place on the upper electrode, perhaps by connecting it to a static machine, a glow fills the egg. This was once suggested as a way to produce safe illumination in mines, but it was found that the glow does not persist long enough to be useful. This instrument was sold by Queen & Co. but probably was manufactured in Europe. The date is unknown.

Discharge Tube and Wooden Base

Similar to a Crooke's discharge tube.

Glass sphere on Wood Base

This may be a discharge tube.

Almy's X-Ray Tube

This probably is the x-ray tube Professor Almy used to produce his first x-ray photographs in February 1896.

X-ray Tube

Rotating cathode from local hospital